Peanut allergy as a trigger for the deterioration of atopic dermatitis and precursor of staphylococcal and herpetic associated infections – case report

Dennis Ferreira 1, Eliane Dios Abad 2, Fernanda Sampaio Cavalcante 3, Fabiana Monteiro dos Santos 3, Simone Saintive 2, Ekaterini Goudoris 2, Evandro Alves do Prado 4, Marcia Ribeiro 5, Alexandre Soares Rosado 3, Jan Dirk van Elsas 3, Kátia Regina Netto dos Santos 6
1 - 1. Fellow by CAPES (Bolsista da CAPES) – Proc. No. BEX 9203 – CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia/DF 70040-020, Brazil 2. Veiga de Almeida University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2 - Pediatric Dermatology Service, IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
3 - Paulo de Goes Microbiology Institute, Federal University Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
4 - Pediatric Allergy Service – IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
5 - Service of Medical Genetics – IPPMG – Martagão Gesteira Pediatric Institute – Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
6 - Paulo de Goes Microbiology Institute, Federal University Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Ann Agric Environ Med
2015; 22 (3):
ICID: 1167716
Article type: Case report
 
 
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial and chronic disease, with genetic, environmental, immunological and nutritional origins. AD may be aggravated by allergies associated with infections. This study aims to describe a paediatric case of AD in which the peanut allergy was the triggering factor to aggravate the disease, and was also the concomitant precursor of staphylococcal (methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, carrier of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL) genes) and herpetic (Herpes Simplex – HSV) infections. The clinical management approach and nursing strategies promoted a favourable evolution during the hospitalization period, besides the family approach, which was essential to control any flare-up of the disease. Adherence to a recommended diet and the use of strategies to prevent any recurrent infections were important to ensure the patient’s quality of life.
DOI: 10.5604/12321966.1167716
PMID 26403117 - click here to show this article in PubMed
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