Can selection explain the protective effects of farming on asthma?

Wijnand Eduard 1, Vivi Schlünssen 2, Torben Sigsgaard 3, Øyvind Omland 4, Neil Pearce 5, Jeroen Douwes 6
1 - 1. Department of Chemical and Biological Work Environment, STAMI National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway2. Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand
2 - Department of Public Health, Section for Environment, Work and Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
3 - Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark
4 - 1. Department of Public Health, Section for Environment, Work and Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 2. Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark
5 - 1. Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand 2. Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
6 - Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand
Ann Agric Environ Med
2015; 22 (3):
ICID: 1167715
Article type: Short communication
 
 
Introduction and objective. Reduced asthma and allergy risks in farmers have been ascribed to microbial exposures. However, selection may also play a role and this was assessed in two Scandinavian farming populations.
Materials and methods. Asthma prevalence in 739 Danish farming students was compared to that of 1,105 siblings. 8,482 Norwegian farmers were also compared with 349 early retired farmers.
Results. The prevalence of ever-asthma was 5.4% in farming students and 5.2% in siblings (OR 1.1; 95%CI 0.73–1.7). Current asthma in farmers was 3.0% compared to 6.3% in farmers who had retired early (OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.1–2.9). Adjustments for early retirement increased the asthma prevalence by 0.3–0.6%. Farmers who had changed production were more likely to have asthma (OR 9.8, 95% CI 6.0–16).
Conclusions. No healthy worker selection into farming was observed and changes in asthma prevalence due to early retirement were small. Selection effects are therefore unlikely to explain the protective effects of farming on asthma.
DOI: 10.5604/12321966.1167715
PMID 26403116 - click here to show this article in PubMed
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